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December 10th, 2007, 08:18 AM   #1
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How does Rossi feel now with himself, does he really believe he can win again? Interviewed on Italian TV, he said:

“It's fun being Valentino Rossi, in more ways than one - it is a high-level life, not ordinary. However, it's already difficult enough when everything goes well, so when things go bad…

These last two years have been full of problems but they've been important for my personal growth and maturity. There are always positive aspects in bad things. Unfortunately one cannot decide when things happen, I could have waited another 15 years…!

People have good feelings towards me, they seem always happy to see me. Even with all the recent problems, my true fans are still backing me, I think…

When you change bike it's more exciting, but a rubber change is interesting as well. When you ride on different tyres, it's almost like riding a new bike. I'm happy, I needed new challenges, new motivations; I have won a lot with Michelin over many years, I had a great time, but in the last two years I suffered too much. I had too many problems.

So now I feel good, let's see what I can do”.

[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif[/img]
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December 10th, 2007, 08:49 AM   #2
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 10 2007, 05:18 PM) [snapback]103960[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
How does Rossi feel now with himself, does he really believe he can win again? Interviewed on Italian TV, he said:

“It's fun being Valentino Rossi, in more ways than one - it is a high-level life, not ordinary. However, it's already difficult enough when everything goes well, so when things go bad…

These last two years have been full of problems but they've been important for my personal growth and maturity. There are always positive aspects in bad things. Unfortunately one cannot decide when things happen, I could have waited another 15 years…!

People have good feelings towards me, they seem always happy to see me. Even with all the recent problems, my true fans are still backing me, I think…

When you change bike it's more exciting, but a rubber change is interesting as well. When you ride on different tyres, it's almost like riding a new bike. I'm happy, I needed new challenges, new motivations; I have won a lot with Michelin over many years, I had a great time, but in the last two years I suffered too much. I had too many problems.

So now I feel good, let's see what I can do”.

[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif[/img]

Like other royalty, I guess you can talk about yourself in the third person too [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif[/img] .
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December 10th, 2007, 10:01 AM   #3
 
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(michaelm @ Dec 10 2007, 06:49 PM) [snapback]103962[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
Like other royalty, I guess you can talk about yourself in the third person too [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif[/img] .


I've noticed that, but they usually all do that. I think it is more about including the team than asuming a royal role.
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December 10th, 2007, 10:45 AM   #4
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Babelfish @ Dec 10 2007, 08:01 PM) [snapback]103966[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
I've noticed that, but they usually all do that. I think it is more about including the team than asuming a royal role.


I don't think it is team spirit, it's just a very big ego like all big champs' [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif[/img]
At least guys like Rossi have some justification for that kind of attitude [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif[/img]
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December 11th, 2007, 02:10 PM   #5
 
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 10 2007, 05:18 PM) [snapback]103960[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>


So now I feel good, let's see what I can do”.

[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif[/img]


I think that Rossi summed it up right there. Let´s see what he can do in 2008.
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December 11th, 2007, 03:49 PM   #6
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 10 2007, 09:18 AM) [snapback]103960[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>


...So now I feel good, let's see what I can do”.


Translation: 'So now that I got my way, and it’s clear that Dorna, and any impartial governing body, et al, belong to me again; so now lets see what I can do.'

Perhaps they can give him a head start in races to really show their love for him, hell he's earned it with all those championships on sub par machinery and dreadful tires, its amazing Honda/Yamaha/Michelin ever did win anything. Unlike his competitors, who don't deserve the same influence in the sport by virtue of their mediocrity.
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December 11th, 2007, 08:01 PM   #7
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Racejumkie @ Dec 11 2007, 07:49 PM) [snapback]104072[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
Translation: 'So now that I got my way, and it’s clear that Dorna, and any impartial governing body, et al, belong to me again; so now lets see what I can do.'

Perhaps they can give him a head start in races to really show their love for him, hell he's earned it with all those championships on sub par machinery and dreadful tires, its amazing Honda/Yamaha/Michelin ever did win anything. Unlike his competitors, who don't deserve the same influence in the sport by virtue of their mediocrity.


DAMN,Im glad your back,A voice of reason.
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December 11th, 2007, 08:12 PM   #8
 
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rossi's ego is getting cut hard
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December 11th, 2007, 08:33 PM   #9
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Racejumkie @ Dec 12 2007, 01:49 AM) [snapback]104072[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
Translation: 'So now that I got my way, and it’s clear that Dorna, and any impartial governing body, et al, belong to me again; so now lets see what I can do.'

Perhaps they can give him a head start in races to really show their love for him, hell he's earned it with all those championships on sub par machinery and dreadful tires, its amazing Honda/Yamaha/Michelin ever did win anything. Unlike his competitors, who don't deserve the same influence in the sport by virtue of their mediocrity.


Do you work for Honda by any chance, or are you old Biaggi's fans?
Do you really think that racing on Stones in '08 amounts to having a head start? Or, do you really believe Honda, Repsol and Pedrosa have less influence than Rossi on Dorna and other bodies?

As a matter of fact, Honda pushed the new 800cc formula with the main aim of beating Valentino Rossi, which has been their declared target since the end of 2003 (check out what Kanazawa said after the Honda-Rossi divorce).

They tried to swarm him with as many Honda's as they could since 2004, giving full support to any rider who managed to be the most successful anti-Rossi weapon.

The funny thing is that Honda, the real godfather (or godmother) of MotoGP, managed to beat Rossi only thanks to the skill and dedication of a rider they had never believed in, - a certain Nicky Hayden.

For 2007 they changed their strategy: no more 'swarming' Rossi with sheer quantity, but focusing on creating the perfect bike-rider-tyres combination to beat him. A combination in which Hayden had no place, surprisingly.

They thought the perfect combination was Pedrosa-new800ccPedrobike-Michelin (after 2005 Michelin have been working closer with Honda than with Rossi), but it backfired on them badly as they actually created the perfect formula for Stoner-DucatiDesmo-Bridgestone [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
I must say I really enjoyed 2007 in this respect!

So much for the 'Rossi always had everything in his favour and controls everything' theory. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif[/img]

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December 11th, 2007, 11:10 PM   #10
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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
Do you work for Honda by any chance, or are you old Biaggi's fans?

Hi J4, Nah, I don't work for Honda, but I am a Biaggi fan.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
Do you really think that racing on Stones in '08 amounts to having a head start? Or, do you really believe Honda, Repsol and Pedrosa have less influence than Rossi on Dorna and other bodies?
Of course racing on Bstones is not a head start. That's not what I said nor even implied. What I said sarcastically was that since Dorna, and any other governing body who presents themselves as 'impartial' should stop with the thinly veiled charlatan act and just give him a head start. They want him to win so bad that they will give him preferential treatment at any cost, even to the detriment of a authentic contest. Its good for their business after-all.

And yes, of course Rossi has more influence than any other rider. This whole tire issue has played out for the world to see proved this reality.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
As a matter of fact, Honda pushed the new 800cc formula with the main aim of beating Valentino Rossi, which has been their declared target since the end of 2003 (check out what Kanazawa said after the Honda-Rossi divorce).

They tried to swarm him with as many Honda's as they could since 2004, giving full support to any rider who managed to be the most successful anti-Rossi weapon.
"Do you work for Honda by any chance?" Wow, you seem to know their strategy. Honda fields the most bikes because they have a much bigger budget. Its not just that they want to beat Rossi, but that they want to win period.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
The funny thing is that Honda, the real godfather (or godmother) of MotoGP, managed to beat Rossi only thanks to the skill and dedication of a rider they had never believed in, - a certain Nicky Hayden.


For 2007 they changed their strategy: no more 'swarming' Rossi with sheer quantity, but focusing on creating the perfect bike-rider-tyres combination to beat him. A combination in which Hayden had no place, surprisingly.
Agree with assessment of Honda's treatment of Hayden here.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
They thought the perfect combination was Pedrosa-new800ccPedrobike-Michelin (after 2005 Michelin have been working closer with Honda than with Rossi), but it backfired on them badly as they actually created the perfect formula for Stoner-DucatiDesmo-Bridgestone [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
I must say I really enjoyed 2007 in this respect!

I agree with you that Honda miscalculated their strategy on making Peders the theme of their engineering, however, I think its a stretch to say that Honda's miscalculation somehow propelled Ducati's dominance. Casey Stoner and his Ducati/Bstones dominated the field, however, take Casey out of the equation, and you have a season where Loris, the other factory Ducati/Bstone painfully struggled.

You seem to forget that Rossi had the second most wins, on top of that, some of the races he came runner up, he lost narrowly. Remember Qatar? If there would have been one mis-step by Casey, Rossi would have won. Oh yeah, this is when the power dominance of the Ducati was at its peak, and yet even then Rossi was able to stick to Casey like a rash all race. So please, I don't think that Honda's Pedro/Michelin combo had any influence on Rossi's Yamaha/Michelin or Ducati. Twice it was conceivable he could have won in addition to the races he did win. It was only after the championship was out of reach did the bike start having break downs and phantom problems requiring pit lane drive-bys.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(J4rn0 @ Dec 11 2007, 09:33 PM) [snapback]104083[/snapback]<div class='quotemain'>
So much for the 'Rossi always had everything in his favour and controls everything' theory. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif[/img]

If you choose not see the reality of his powerful influence that grants him getting his way, even when Bstones had announced it would NOT provide anybody else with their tires, then the threats of a spec tire produced a dramatic turn around, then really I can't convince you of anything the real world has to offer. I've been reading the threads on this issue, and the best the Rossi apologists (not to be confused with his fans or fans of the sport) who care to make sense of it, their thematic and repeating argument is, 'well he deserves it because he has won' and 'he deserves it because he has made the sport popular' or some variation of this rationalization. In other words, they concede there has been a move in Rossi's favor, but the justification is, he deserves it by virtue of his winning record. Shit, the guy has always been on the best or near best equipment, teams, etc, and the governing bodies on his side to boot. It slipped for a moment in 06-07, but make no mistake, this tire issue outcome was not only a statement that he would be granted the currently and perceived better tire, but more importantly, it has shown that yes, he (Rossi) has all the influence to move the sport because its a business first/more and an authentic contest second/less. Don't worry, I will eventually get to the tire threads. And when I do, all the best debaters and arguments to try and justify his preferential treatment will be exposed for the sham and biased shallow arguments they really are. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif[/img]

Final note here: Listen, I’m not interested in bashing Rossi on account that some of his apologists chose not to acknowledge the reality of the politics of the sport. Rossi has merited many accolades, some well deserved, and some obliged just a little bit by the powers that be, so it’s less about him and more about the lack of integrity/backbone and lack of neutrality that the governing bodies are willing to preserve. Of which Rossi shares in the guilt by enabling and wielding his influence to exacerbate the impartiality. They have shown that they are businessmen primarily rather than interested in fair and impartial competition. But what irks me is this non-willingness by 'some' of his fans not to call it for what it is. So you may choose not to ponder the debate and chalk it up to simple Rossi bashing, or you can ponder that there really is an issue here beyond the simple cheerleading for a particular rider. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif[/img]
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