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November 16th, 2015, 04:59 AM   #211
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He doesn't look fast but he sure as fuck is....

...just awesome...
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November 16th, 2015, 09:14 AM   #212
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Yes, though I know nothing about the modern electronics used on these bikes, the smoothest guy is still going to be the fastest if everybody is at the limit.

When Kenny Roberts first slid the rear wheel around the corner to square it off and gas it down the next straight, it worked....back then. Looked good too. (Some say Saarinen did it first....)

Today, it still looks good but it's no longer the fastest way around, at least not for the whole race. Actually, it's been that way for quite some time. McCoy used to slither around in a most entertaining way but I can't remember him getting many good results. Nick might have been the last guy to use that technique and win.

Marquez still does it and wins, but we've seen him fall down a lot too. I will bet that he gets smoother out of necessity.

I remember watching F1 in the 80's and early 90's: Prost or Senna would sign a pole or a fastest lap and look slow doing it.
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November 16th, 2015, 12:37 PM   #213
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Yes, though I know nothing about the modern electronics used on these bikes, the smoothest guy is still going to be the fastest if everybody is at the limit.

When Kenny Roberts first slid the rear wheel around the corner to square it off and gas it down the next straight, it worked....back then. Looked good too. (Some say Saarinen did it first....)

Today, it still looks good but it's no longer the fastest way around, at least not for the whole race. Actually, it's been that way for quite some time. McCoy used to slither around in a most entertaining way but I can't remember him getting many good results. Nick might have been the last guy to use that technique and win.

Marquez still does it and wins, but we've seen him fall down a lot too. I will bet that he gets smoother out of necessity.

I remember watching F1 in the 80's and early 90's: Prost or Senna would sign a pole or a fastest lap and look slow doing it.
Marquez does indeed square the corner off and the Honda appears to like being ridden that way prompting even Pedrosa to adapt his style. The 990s were perfect for this and suited Nicky's style, but it is not comparable to McCoy who was an extraordinary talent.

You don't remember the lab rat 'getting good results' because the tyre that he requested was a one off from Michelin which few others had the talent to ride. Unlike the preferential treatment that the 'Doctored' later received this rubber was available to all, I would argue that McCoy was exploiting a Michelin on the 16.5 rim which was extremely difficult to use. Everyone followed suit because they assumed that simply reverting to the narrower rear was the key to his recent success. McCoy's special compound got sidelined in the process and he was forced to opt for the more amenable forgiving choices of tyre demanded by the rest of the paddock which negated much of the advantage that he had worked hard to perfect. Arguably Valentino was perhaps the only rider gifted enough to capitalise on the McCpy tyre. Garry did this on Clifford's WCM customer YZR - which had the same entire annual budget as an HRC rider would consume in tear offs alone.

McCoy's style was totally different to the 'tail gunning' revolution of the American dirt trackers. It wasn't just ad-hoc smoking the rear as you make it sound, Like Stoner, he would light up the rear and powerslide and almost perfect arc around a constant radius turn. If done smoothly it could actually enhance a lap time.

In spite of the advent of slipper clutches and electronic aids, we still see riders back it in - particularly in Superbike and Moto2, but as I have been at pains to point out in the past, that is something altogether different.
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Last edited by Arrabbiata1; November 16th, 2015 at 12:41 PM.
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November 16th, 2015, 01:28 PM   #214
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There was a race in 2014. I can't for the life of me remember which one...late in the season? But the camera angles were rider level and from the rear (steady...) on corner entry for several corners. Marquez was trailing JL and looked like he was going to stuff it up the inside (steady....) every corner. The wide corner entry sweeping lines from JL looked like he was opening the door every time. They were something to behold and kept Marquez completely at bay. I remembered that in the light of Valencia and PI (yes I know he passed J, but on last lap).
Sorry to.be so vague, but it was a sterling display of the differing riding styles..
He has a unique style that's difficult to describe (especially the way he tucks in his legs and elbows) and his mid corner speed is incredible...I cant think of another rider to compare his riding technique with tbh.
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November 16th, 2015, 01:50 PM   #215
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Marquez does indeed square the corner off and the Honda appears to like being ridden that way prompting even Pedrosa to adapt his style. The 990s were perfect for this and suited Nicky's style, but it is not comparable to McCoy who was an extraordinary talent.

You don't remember the lab rat 'getting good results' because the tyre that he requested was a one off from Michelin which few others had the talent to ride. Unlike the preferential treatment that the 'Doctored' later received this rubber was available to all, I would argue that McCoy was exploiting a Michelin on the 16.5 rim which was extremely difficult to use. Everyone followed suit because they assumed that simply reverting to the narrower rear was the key to his recent success. McCoy's special compound got sidelined in the process and he was forced to opt for the more amenable forgiving choices of tyre demanded by the rest of the paddock which negated much of the advantage that he had worked hard to perfect. Arguably Valentino was perhaps the only rider gifted enough to capitalise on the McCpy tyre. Garry did this on Clifford's WCM customer YZR - which had the same entire annual budget as an HRC rider would consume in tear offs alone.

McCoy's style was totally different to the 'tail gunning' revolution of the American dirt trackers. It wasn't just ad-hoc smoking the rear as you make it sound, Like Stoner, he would light up the rear and powerslide and almost perfect arc around a constant radius turn. If done smoothly it could actually enhance a lap time.

In spite of the advent of slipper clutches and electronic aids, we still see riders back it in - particularly in Superbike and Moto2, but as I have been at pains to point out in the past, that is something altogether different.
His first win at Welkom was a joy to behold and his riding in the 2000 season was one of the highlights of watching the 500 strokers during their rein...

His use of that extra hard tire and his unique sliding style should have shredded the rear but apparently the decreased traction from spinning the rear so much actually extended the tires life....go figure.

He was the sultan of slide and I often wonder how far he could have gone with the unlimited support enjoyed by some of his peers.



Good article about how Gazza set up a riding school for future Aussie MGP prospects...

Garry McCoy still squiggling - Motorbike Writer

He also made an appearance on Blokesworld recently when they did one of their motorbike rides through Vietnam/Laos...classic show!
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November 16th, 2015, 01:54 PM   #216
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Apparently if you spun it up fast enough, as Gary did, it kind of skimmed. As a result it heated the skin of the tire but the tire body was heated less.
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November 16th, 2015, 02:34 PM   #217
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His first win at Welkom was a joy to behold and his riding in the 2000 season was one of the highlights of watching the 500 strokers during their rein...

His use of that extra hard tire and his unique sliding style should have shredded the rear but apparently the decreased traction from spinning the rear so much actually extended the tires life....go figure.

He was the sultan of slide and I often wonder how far he could have gone with the unlimited support enjoyed by some of his peers.



Good article about how Gazza set up a riding school for future Aussie MGP prospects...

Garry McCoy still squiggling - Motorbike Writer

He also made an appearance on Blokesworld recently when they did one of their motorbike rides through Vietnam/Laos...classic show!
For those who came in late, he is the reason for your "Mr Squiggle"' forum name.

For him to win 3 premier class races on a customer bike which, as Arabb has put it previously, figuratively arrived at the circuit in the boot of a car so under-resourced was his team, was entirely remarkable. In his race wins he usually came through the field late when the tyres of other riders were fading, so his style paradoxically did somehow allow him to get better late race performance from his tyres, apart from being spectacular to watch, even if I recall drawing VR's admiration in what was his first season riding in the premier class on the 500 Honda.

How sustainable his method was is a different question, he did crash and injure himself rather frequently, but it would indeed have been interesting to see how he went with a better funded team or even if he had been able to continue with his preferred tyre.
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November 16th, 2015, 04:06 PM   #218
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Oh my God ... Serious news
Read More => http://goo.gl/8gtVVl
SPAM
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November 16th, 2015, 04:11 PM   #219
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I know sliding the bike today is different, I'm sure it's a little different every year, and I certainly don't mean to imply McCoy was cavalier about it, he was awesome to watch.

Just got lazy wordsmithing I guess.

Hard to compare riders and styles when the bikes and the rules change so much.

What if they had to push start the bikes today!
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November 16th, 2015, 10:38 PM   #220
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What if they had to push start the bikes today!
1000cc four strokes...interesting.

Most of them need a step ladder or a best a foot stool to mount the damn thing these days.

They should insist on a Le Mans style start at every race. Marquez would be tripping other riders up and Rossi would be kicking them.
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